NOS Energy Drink Sends Teen to Hospital

nos
Reports of energy drinks causing adverse health effects on teens are becoming more common. Some have even been linked to deaths.

Several versions of NOS Energy Drink contain about 100mg more caffeine than the typical energy drink, and therefore, teens could possibly find themselves overdosing more readily.

One Such NOS Overdose

A Carl Junction, Missouri teen recently had quite an experience after he drank NOS Energy Drink.

Dakota Sailor came home from school and decided he would throw back not one, but two cans of NOS Energy Drink. That is the last thing he remembers as his parents found him unconscious on the sofa aspirating. He was rushed to the hospital and recovered a few days later.

The doctors ran various tests but concluded that it was probably the energy drink that was the culprit in this incident. The doctors said that  high doses of caffeine could have caused his seizure.

Checking out the Caffeine Database, we see that NOS has 260 milligrams of caffeine per can so that puts Sailor at 520mg of caffeine from NOS plus he admitted to having additional caffeine earlier in the day. Note: NOS has reformulated their energy drink to contain 160 mg per can.

Normally, this amount of caffeine isn’t anywhere near a toxic amount. According to Death by Caffeine it would take around 45 cans of NOS to send you packing for the afterlife, but everyone is different and some are more sensitive to caffeine than others. The teen obviously had a reaction to something.

Teens and Parents are Urged to Heed Can Warnings

It is evident in the case above that the teen did not responsibly drink the product and heed the warnings clearly printed on the NOS can.

This case really highlights the importance of not only reading but following the recommended and max dosage warning printed on NOS as well as other energy drinks.

Energy Drinks are NOT soda and shouldn’t be consumed as such. Often teens may need some guidance in this area as they don’t always make smart decisions for their health and wellbeing.

Steps parents can take to prevent teens from consuming too much.

  1. Ask questions. Talk to your kids and find out what they are drinking throughout the day. Some parents may not even be aware their kids are drinking energy drinks.
  2. Accountability. Make your teens accountable for what they spend their allowance or money on. Make them save receipts and keep a budget. This teaches them money management and allows you to see what they are buying.
  3. Don’t buy energy drinks for your teens. Or, only buy them as an occasional treat and buy them ones with moderate levels of caffeine. A daily safe limit of caffeine for teens is about 100mg.
  4. Teach them how to read product labels and to look for warning information.

The reason this site exists is to educate the consumer about the caffeine levels of most of the energy drinks that are out there. This helps people be aware of how much caffeine they are consuming and hopefully works to prevent accidental energy drink overdoses, such as what happened with this young man and NOS Energy Drink.

Source: The Joplin Globe

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  • steven hernandez

    Due to the amount of caffeine and other ingredients within NOS energy, the drink is not required to be sold strictly to individuals over the age of 18. However, if you look at such energy drinks or energy shots as Redline which has caused a couple deaths if i’m not mistaken you will see that those drinks which contain higher then average levels do require that any individual buying said drink show valid ID.

  • emac4875

    Barry…Having one a day maybe ok ..although you may develop bleeding stomach ulcers and cardiac problems..
    What teenager do you know actually reads the contents of a can? They are gullible and feel immortal. We need to raise awareness to the fact that these drinks can send you to the hospital for heart failure or cardiac arrest. Do you know that over 200,000 teenagers were seen in emergency rooms last year for cardiac irregularities and 10 reported deaths caused by a heart attacks.
    Barry……………check the statistics. The numbers have doubled since 2012.

  • W

    Notice how most of the comments of the people who had side effects were younger than 16 years old. Kids do not need energy drinks at that age, period.

  • The Truth

    Generally most people can tolerate caffeine. It could be the case that this particular teen had a sensitivity to caffeine, whereby it can then produce such affects. And though it is rare, It’s important to note that not everyone bares the gene that allows you to take many mg of caffeine without the jitters. So best to keep your consumption under 150mg a day.

  • Taylor

    Nos only have 160mg of caffeine per can. I’m literally looking at my drink right now.

  • Taylor

    Nos contains only 160mg of caffeine, I’m looking at the can now..

  • Taylor

    Nos only contains 160mg per can so I don’t why the authors source says 200-something. I literally looking at the can now and it says “Daily caffeine consumption should be limited to approximately 400mg per day from all sources. This product has 160mg per package. Too much caffeine may cause nervousness, irritability, sleeplessness and occasionally rapid heartbeat. Caffefine content: 160 mg/ 16 fl oz [a regular sized can is 16 fl oz]” then it goes on to say “Not recommended for individuals under 18 years of age, pregnant or nursing women, or those sensitive to caffeine.” The can/company states the true caffeine content of the beverage and warns side effects of the amount of caffeine in the drink and last, it says specifically that minors/children should not drink it. The company is not at fault but the child (even though I’m sure there’s more to the story than just ingesting an excessive amount of caffeine) and the child’s parental figures. You don’t see anyone freaking out about how a child got hurt in a car wreck after ‘under age driving’. The public is then like “the child shouldn’t have been driving without a license,” so why is it different that a child drank a highly caffeinated drink after the can says not to drink it if you fit any of the preexisting conditions (including age) listed on the can.

  • Taylor

    If children are gullible and unaware why are parents allowing their child to make decisions for themselves. When I have children if they can’t grasp the concept of reading labels before ingesting a product then I probably also can’t trust them with butter knives. come on..

  • Taylor

    Nos only contains 160mg per can so I don’t why the authors source says 200-something. I literally looking at the can now and it says “Daily caffeine consumption should be limited to approximately 400mg per day from all sources. This product has 160mg per package. Too much caffeine may cause nervousness, irritability, sleeplessness and occasionally rapid heartbeat. Caffefine content: 160 mg/ 16 fl oz [a regular sized can is 16 fl oz]” then it goes on to say “Not recommended for individuals under 18 years of age, pregnant or nursing women, or those sensitive to caffeine.” The can/company states the true caffeine content of the beverage and warns side effects of the amount of caffeine in the drink and last, it says specifically that minors/children should not drink it. The company is not at fault but the child (even though I’m sure there’s more to the story than just ingesting an excessive amount of caffeine) and the child’s parental figures. You don’t see anyone freaking out about how a child got hurt in a car wreck after ‘under age driving’. The public is then like “the child shouldn’t have been driving without a license,” so why is it different that a child drank a highly caffeinated drink after the can says not to drink it if you fit any of the preexisting conditions (including age) listed on the can.

  • Taylor

    I agree with you! I’m 18 and I drink caffeine on occasion. I’m in college now but all through high school I had 8 classes with hours and hours of homework plus a demanding (for a teenager) job and never got enough sleep during the week so I drank caffeine every day. I only consumed one smaller sized red bull and I was set for at least the majority of the day. I didn’t drink it unless I needed it and I didn’t drink tons of it at a time. I mellowed my caffeine habits during the summer because I didn’t need it. I got an adequate amount of sleep to function properly. I didn’t chug them or use them to get hyper but just to keep me up throughout the day. I was a younger teen and had the knowledge, intelligence and responsible capability to not harm my body with excessive amounts of caffeine. If the child is unintelligent when it comes to their own safety then caffeine is not the issue.

  • Taylor

    Nos only contains 160mg per can so I don’t why the authors source says 200-something. I literally looking at the can now and it says “Daily caffeine consumption should be limited to approximately 400mg per day from all sources. This product has 160mg per package. Too much caffeine may cause nervousness, irritability, sleeplessness and occasionally rapid heartbeat. Caffefine content: 160 mg/ 16 fl oz [a regular sized can is 16 fl oz]” then it goes on to say “Not recommended for individuals under 18 years of age, pregnant or nursing women, or those sensitive to caffeine.” The can/company states the true caffeine content of the beverage and warns side effects of the amount of caffeine in the drink and last, it says specifically that minors/children should not drink it. The company is not at fault but the child (even though I’m sure there’s more to the story than just ingesting an excessive amount of caffeine) and the child’s parental figures. You don’t see anyone freaking out about how a child got hurt in a car wreck after ‘under age driving’. The public is then like “the child shouldn’t have been driving without a license,” so why is it different that a child drank a highly caffeinated drink after the can says not to drink it if you fit any of the preexisting conditions (including age) listed on the can.

  • Brian T

    Yyyyeah but… I think there’s a line here where the store owner can and should do the right thing, law or no law. Personal responsibility for minors is a grey area. In the court of public opinion, I think any store owner who looks out for the best interests of their youngest and most vulnerable customers by denying sales of energy drinks, will get a lot more support from the community than ones hiding behind laws defending their right to sell these products.

    Don’t wait for a law to get passed (we all know how efficient that process is), to do the right thing.

  • Ted

    Originally NOS contained 260mg of caffeine but was lowered when Coca Cola took over.

  • Ted

    Originally NOS contained 260mg of caffeine but was lowered when Coca Cola took over. This was the version that caused the above overdose case.

  • cnnspy

    They do not ‘need’ cell phones in class either but its just the times. I never ‘just died’ if I couldn’t tell the masses that I was eating a burger on the spot.

  • Alexzander Whitmer

    Oh please, I’m on my 2nd NOS right now and I drank a Monster a few hours ago. Don’t act like energy drinks are evil just because one kid has a weak system. As the doctor said it would take 45ish to kill someone. That kid just has a weak tolerance to caffeine and a weak body. Ive drunken literally 2-24 packs of monster in 3 days before and I was fine, no sleep at all and a little jittery in class. Stop acting like its the end of the world because Mr. Sailor can’t take the caffeine. And parents should not dare ask what a kid is doing with their money,it is their money, I do not care if they live in your house or not. If you think you have the right to dictate what they can buy then GTFO America because you are obviously a tyrant with little power.

  • Alexzander Whitmer

    Oh really, welp im at 2 nos’s today and a monster. SO FAR

  • Alexzander Whitmer

    You do not need to tell people what they can and cant do. Minors or not.

  • Alexzander Whitmer

    I’m 17. Heres how it works. If I want to buy a damn energy drink. I will walk in the store get the energy drink walk to the counter. You either let me buy it or I will just put the money on the counter and walk out of the store with it in my hand. Call the cops I dare thee.

  • David

    At one point I was drinking 4-5 a day just to get by. I have a Noz every morning now and I always have packs at my house I sometimes drink withe breakfast lunch dinner and a midnight snack. The kid just couldn’t handle the caffeine. I’m 18 and a college student by the way

Last Modified: October 22, 2015